Risk factors

This section looks at the factors which make one person more likely to snore than another. Some of these factors are within our control and can lead to an easy solution to a snoring problem. Many, unfortuantely, are not.

Age

As we age past about 40, muscle tone decreases. This can be partially offset if we exercise enough, but there's no avoiding the fact that older people are floppier. This effects all the muscles in our body, including those that support the airway and hold it open when we breathe. Consequently, aging leads to us having an airway which is more likely to be noisy.

So for your future birthdays, try putting one less candle on the cake each year until you are back in your twenties. That should take care of this risk factor and stop your snoring.

Weight

Being overweight itself is not a risk factor for snoring - you could have the world's biggest tummy and not snore at all. The issue is that any fat your body chooses to store around your airway is going to reduce the space available for you to breathe through, and also make the walls of your airway softer and floppier. Obviously this is not a good combination if you want to avoid snoring.

So for most people, even the quite thin, losing weight will reduce the likelihood of snoring as long as the fat that is lost is lost from around the airway.

Alcohol

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Sleeping position

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Allergies

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